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Panel

We have several established researchers coming from academia, industry and government to talk about their roles in research and how they got there.

Jill Burstein - Educational Testing Service
Jill Burstein
Ph.D. is a Principal Research Scientist in ETS’ Research & Development in the NLP and Speech Research Group. Her background and expertise is in natural language processing with a focus on building applications for educational technology. Her inventions include e-rater®, an automated essay scoring system; an essay-based discourse analysis system, and Language MuseSM, an NLP-driven instructional authoring tool for teachers. Her current research interests include NLP systems that evaluate argumentation in test-taker writing, including discourse coherence and opinion detection. Dr. Burstein holds 13 patents for NLP-based, educational technology inventions. Previously, Dr. Burstein was a linguistics consultant at AT&T Bell Laboratories. Dr. Burstein received her B.A. in Linguistics and Spanish from New York University and her M.A. and Ph.D. in Linguistics from the City University of New York, Graduate Center.

Chris Callison-Burch - Johns Hopkins University

Chris Callison-Burch is an Associate Research Professor at the Center for Language and Speech Processing (CLSP) at Johns Hopkins University. He received his PhD from the University of Edinburgh’s School of Informatics in 2008 and his bachelors from Stanford University’s Symbolic Systems Program in 2000. His research focuses on statistical machine translation, crowdsourcing, and broad coverage semantics via paraphrasing. He has contributed to the research community by releasing open source software like Moses and Joshua, and by organizing the shared tasks for the annual Workshop on Statistical Machine Translation (WMT). He the chairman of the North American chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics (NAACL), and he is on the editorial boards of Computational Linguistics and the Transactions of the Association for Computational Linguistics (TACL).  He has accepted a tenure-track job offer from the Computer and Information Sciences Department at the University of Pennsylvania, and will be starting there in September 2013.


Mitch Marcus - University of Pennsylvania

Shankar Kumar - Google

Shankar Kumar is a researcher at Google. His current interests are in machine learning techniques applied to natural language processing. He has worked in both the speech recognition and the language translation groups at Google.

Jack Godfrey - Government Guest Researcher, HLTCOE
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